Wednesday, October 21, 2020

Hong Kong Chief Executive abolishes decades old Controversial extradition bill

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Zubair Yaqoob
Zubair Yaqoob
The author has diversified experience in investigative journalism. He is Chief content editor at wnobserver.com He can be reached at: [email protected]

Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam announced on Tuesday that the extradition bill that sparked the largest political crisis in the region over the last few decades was completely abolished.

In his media conference, Lam admits the government’s intention to realize the law is considered a failure.

The bill that will allow the city’s population to be sent to mainland China for talks, sparking mass protests and plunging the territory of the former British colony into chaos.

In mid-June, Lam suspended the bill following the mega protest but his actions failed to ease the crisis as protesters continued to protest against controversial legislation while urging leaders with support from China to resign.

In early June, Hong Kong residents demonstrated biggest protest since the Democracy Movement in 2014, when protesters calling for more democracy paralyzed parts of Hong Kong for weeks.

Read also: Hundreds of Thousands of people gathered in Hong Kong ahead of country’s handover to China

Participants in the demonstrations held signs saying “No delivery to China” or “Delivered to China, gone forever”.

The former British Crown Colony has been governed largely autonomously since its return to China in 1997 on the principle of “one country, two systems” as its own territory.

Seven million inhabitants of today’s Chinese Special Administrative Region enjoy greater political freedom than people in the People’s Republic, including the right to freedom of expression, freedom of the press and assembly. With the louder call for real democracy in Hong Kong, however, Beijing is tightening its ties.

Read also: Anti-extradition protests in Hong Kong ended peacefully

Zubair Yaqoob
Zubair Yaqoob
The author has diversified experience in investigative journalism. He is Chief content editor at wnobserver.com He can be reached at: [email protected]

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