Thursday, November 14, 2019

No restriction on Muslims in Beijing, China

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Zubair Yaqoob
Zubair Yaqoob
The author has diversified experience in investigative journalism. He is Chief content editor at wnobserver.com He can be reached at: [email protected]

The Chinese Islamic Association claims that Muslims in the country are not prohibited from practicing religious teachings other than the government plans various efforts involving the economic and social development of the Muslim community.

Deputy president of the association, Abdul Amin Jin Rubin, said, almost 200,000 Beijing Muslim residents enjoyed the benefits offered by the government, such as business assistance in the food and beverage (F & B) sector.

“Halal economy is given priority and the thing is clear when thousands of halal concept restaurants are available to meet current demand.

“In addition, the Muslim community is also not restricted to visiting the mosque for prayers, religious studies and even other religious activities.

“The government also allocated a high budget to provide a special land for the funeral of Muslim communities here,” he said.

He said this when receiving a visit from Malaysia and Indonesia to Beijing and Xinjiang, China, organized by the country’s embassy, ​​on Monday.

Abdul Amin said that every year the state government is rallying on the basis of upgrading the lives of Muslim communities including in Xinjiang, China.

“The vocational and vocational program is aimed at improving the skills of the work, especially among the Muslim community.

“This vocational skill also help the public to generate double the income from before,” he said.

Meanwhile, touching on some riots took place in Xinjiang in 2009 followed by several other incidents, Abdul Amin said it had nothing to do with the problem of Islam.

“Extremism and terrorism are banned not only in this country but the whole world dismisses the ideology.

“My personal opinion the problem of violence and violence can be contained through the correct religious approach.

“Islamic teachings emphasize peace, harmony and unity among the people,” he said.

Currently, Muslims are a minority group in China, representing between 0.45% to 1.8% of the total population according to the latest estimates.

Zubair Yaqoob
Zubair Yaqoob
The author has diversified experience in investigative journalism. He is Chief content editor at wnobserver.com He can be reached at: [email protected]

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