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Boeing CEO admits fatal errors in 737 Max 8

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Zubair Yaqoob
The author has diversified experience in investigative journalism. He is Chief content editor at wnobserver.com

Boeing Chief Executive Dennis Muilenburg admitted on Tuesday that the company made “mistakes” in the fatal crashes of 737 Max 8 aircraft in Indonesia and Ethiopia while speaking before the US Senate.

“We know we made mistakes and that we were wrong. We are guilty of that,” Dennis Muilenburg, told the Senate Trade Committee on Tuesday.

It was the first time Boeing recognized in the US Congress that it made mistakes that caused the deaths of hundreds of people that cost billions of dollars to the Chicago-based company.

Boeing recognized in the US Congress that it made mistakes that caused the deaths of hundreds of people 

“In my name and in the name of Boeing, we are very sorry. We are deeply sorry,” said Dennis Muilenburg, at a hearing attended by some family members of fatal victims of the crashes.

The first testimony of Boeing’s executive president at the US Congress comes exactly one year after the crash of an Indonesian airline Lion Air 737 Max 8, which killed 189 people, including all passengers and crew.

Five months later, a plane of the same model as Ethiopian Airlines crashed under similar circumstances, killing 157 people.

Since then, all Boeing 737 Max 8s have been taken out of circulation worldwide.

An Indonesian investigation found that the crash of the Lion Air flight, which killed 189 people a year ago, was due to a combination of flaws in aircraft design, pilot training and maintenance.

Pilots were never told how to respond quickly to automated control system failures of Boeing 737 Max 8

The crash’s final report, released Oct. 25, says Lion Air Flight 610, which linked Indonesia’s capital to Sumatra Island, crashed because pilots were never told how to respond quickly to automated control system failures of Boeing 737 Max 8.

The plane plunged into the Java Sea just 13 minutes after taking off on 29 October 2018.

According to Indonesia’s National Transport Safety Committee, the automated system, known as Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System (MCAS), had a unique angle of attack sensor that provided misinformation by automatically pushing the nose down.

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