Friday, October 18, 2019

F1 Singapore: How does smog affect fans and racers?

Featured

Afghanistan: Presidential Election to begin today amid widespread security threats

Afghanistan: Voters flocked to the polling stations on Saturday (Today) to cast their ballots in the presidential election, amid...

Saudi Defense vulnerability against low flying objects

The Saudis were simply not prepared for such attacks? They have state-of-the-art fighter jets, but the Saudi defense systems...

Shinzo Abe reshuffles Japanese Cabinet, Shinjiro Koizumi appointed as environment minister

Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe appoints foreign ministers and new defense ministers, in addition to elevating rising political figures,...
Adil Ghaffar
Adil Ghaffar
Experienced Chief Executive Officer with a demonstrated history of working in the financial services' industry. Skilled in Negotiation, Business Planning, Microsoft Word, Accounting, and Team Building. Strong business development professional with an ACA focused in Accounting and Finance from institute of chartered accountants of Pakistan. Contact: [email protected]

F1 Singapore racing scheduled to be held again on the streets of the country this weekend,  just as air quality in the city has reached its worst level in three years.

The haze that hit Singapore is caused by forest and land fires in Indonesia and Malaysia, which have become an annual agenda in the region.

So as Singapore gets ready for F1 luxury, the usually bright blue sky has turned foggy and pale gray.

The city skyline is shrouded in fog and air, which is officially classified as unhealthy, brings with it the smell of burning.

Singapore’s authorities and F1 officials did their best to convince fans that it was safe to come in these conditions – and the race continued.

The impact of the smog on F1 race

Night racing in Singapore is considered the most troublesome event this season. If the fog persists, and visibility is low, things will become more difficult.

“This is not just safety considerations for drivers”, meteorologist Professor Koh Tieh Yong from Singapore University of Social Sciences told the BBC.

“It’s also about whether they can do their best. Because the vehicle is going so fast, the racers have to look far ahead. So for the racers, visibility will be a greater factor than for the spectators.

“That will affect their performance even before it affects their safety”. Even without the fog, the Singapore night race is a difficult for the racers.

Read also: Singapore uncovers ‘Underground city’, master plan 2019

Adil Ghaffar
Adil Ghaffar
Experienced Chief Executive Officer with a demonstrated history of working in the financial services' industry. Skilled in Negotiation, Business Planning, Microsoft Word, Accounting, and Team Building. Strong business development professional with an ACA focused in Accounting and Finance from institute of chartered accountants of Pakistan. Contact: [email protected]

Latest News

Johnson: We have a great new deal that puts us in control

Boris Johnson said on twitter: "We have a great new deal that puts us in control, now Parliament should...

Trump will host G7 2020 summit at his Doral golf resort in Florida

US President Donald Trump will host G7 economic summit next year at one of his real estate properties, the Trump National Doral Golf Resort...

Italy plans to impose 3 percent tax on tech giants from 2020

Italy has decided to impose a new tax on digital companies, including US technology giants, as part of the 2020 budget project, a move...

Demonstrations in Catalonia entered third day in a row

Demonstrations I in Catalonia entered their third day in a row, reaffirming their demands for independence from Spain, leading to clashes with police. In Barcelona,...

Kurdish militia and their allies suspended combat missions against IS

Kurdish militia and their allies have completely suspended their combat missions against the Islamic State (IS) jihadist militia. "We have frozen all our activities against...
- Advertisement -

Related News