Wednesday, February 26, 2020

F1 Singapore: How does smog affect fans and racers?

Featured

US official: Corona’s outbreak will not change China’s commitment to buy US goods

A senior US Treasury official said on Thursday that the US government expects China to fulfill its commitment to...

China: Corona virus death toll rises to 2239, and 75,567 infections

China’s National Health Committee announced on Friday that it has received reports of 889 new confirmed cases of the...

A major reshuffle in the British Government

Several British government ministers have been fired in a drastic reshuffle by Prime Minister Boris Johnson. The list includes...
Adil Ghaffar
Adil Ghaffar
Experienced Chief Executive Officer with a demonstrated history of working in the financial services' industry. Skilled in Negotiation, Business Planning, Microsoft Word, Accounting, and Team Building. Strong business development professional with an ACA focused in Accounting and Finance from institute of chartered accountants of Pakistan. Contact: [email protected]

F1 Singapore racing scheduled to be held again on the streets of the country this weekend,  just as air quality in the city has reached its worst level in three years.

The haze that hit Singapore is caused by forest and land fires in Indonesia and Malaysia, which have become an annual agenda in the region.

So as Singapore gets ready for F1 luxury, the usually bright blue sky has turned foggy and pale gray.

The city skyline is shrouded in fog and air, which is officially classified as unhealthy, brings with it the smell of burning.

Singapore’s authorities and F1 officials did their best to convince fans that it was safe to come in these conditions – and the race continued.

The impact of the smog on F1 race

Night racing in Singapore is considered the most troublesome event this season. If the fog persists, and visibility is low, things will become more difficult.

“This is not just safety considerations for drivers”, meteorologist Professor Koh Tieh Yong from Singapore University of Social Sciences told the BBC.

“It’s also about whether they can do their best. Because the vehicle is going so fast, the racers have to look far ahead. So for the racers, visibility will be a greater factor than for the spectators.

“That will affect their performance even before it affects their safety”. Even without the fog, the Singapore night race is a difficult for the racers.

Read also: Singapore uncovers ‘Underground city’, master plan 2019

Adil Ghaffar
Adil Ghaffar
Experienced Chief Executive Officer with a demonstrated history of working in the financial services' industry. Skilled in Negotiation, Business Planning, Microsoft Word, Accounting, and Team Building. Strong business development professional with an ACA focused in Accounting and Finance from institute of chartered accountants of Pakistan. Contact: [email protected]

Latest News

Breaking: Malaysian PM Dr Mahathir submits resignation to the King

Dr Mahathir Mohamad has sent his resignation letter as Prime Minister of Malaysia today. According to the Prime Minister's Office,...

Trump adviser Roger Stone sentenced to 3 years in prison for lying

A federal judge issued a ruling on Thursday against Roger Stone, a longtime adviser to US President Donald Trump, to three years and four...

US official: Corona’s outbreak will not change China’s commitment to buy US goods

A senior US Treasury official said on Thursday that the US government expects China to fulfill its commitment to purchase more US goods under...

Voting begins in Iran’s parliamentary elections

The Iranians began voting on Friday in a parliamentary election that is unlikely to change Tehran's troubled relations with the United States, after excluding...

Austrian Parliament: There is no place for ISIS operatives in the country

Herbert Kickel, head of the Parliamentary Bloc of the Freedom Party (the third largest Austrian party), confirmed that anyone who joined the terrorist group...

Related News