Wednesday, October 21, 2020

High levels of methylmercury in the world’s oceans threaten to eliminate fish

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Adil Ghaffar
Adil Ghaffar
Experienced Chief Executive Officer with a demonstrated history of working in the financial services' industry. Skilled in Negotiation, Business Planning, Microsoft Word, Accounting, and Team Building. Strong business development professional with an ACA focused in Accounting and Finance from institute of chartered accountants of Pakistan. Contact: [email protected]

High levels of methylmercury in the world’s oceans threatens to eradicate fish, according to a recent report published in the daily mail.

Scientists have warned that increased toxic mercury in seafood threatens human health, including cod and tuna, as warm water forces them continue to eat more food.

About four-fifth of the mercury that is put into the atmosphere for natural and human causes, such as coal burning, ends up in the ocean where some are converted by microorganisms into a particularly dangerous form known as methylmercury.

This “methylmercury”, which can affect brain function, travels the food chain and accumulates in the best predators at high concentrations.

As the sea warms, these fish use more energy for swimming that requires more calories – so they eat more and store more toxins.

Mercury pollution affects changes in the diet of species, including cod and tuna as a result of overfishing of their food sources such as herring, on the amount of methylmercury they consume and store in their bodies, researchers from Harvard University said.

Read also: Global warming: Fish will disappear in the next few years

Adil Ghaffar
Adil Ghaffar
Experienced Chief Executive Officer with a demonstrated history of working in the financial services' industry. Skilled in Negotiation, Business Planning, Microsoft Word, Accounting, and Team Building. Strong business development professional with an ACA focused in Accounting and Finance from institute of chartered accountants of Pakistan. Contact: [email protected]

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