Friday, November 22, 2019

NASA targets coastal ecosystem using GLIMR, a new space sensor

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Izaan Zubair
Izaan's expertise in technology urged him to write on emerging inventions, Hardware, Cyber-Security, Mobiles and so on. He is currently studying Machine learning, and aims to master it. He can be reached at: [email protected]

NASA, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration has chosen a new space instrument GLIMR that will make observations on coastal waters to help protect the sustainability of the ecosystem, improve resource management, and promote economic activity.

According to phys,It provides the instrument for measuring radiation and monitoring the simultaneous radiation of the oceans ecosystem (GLIMR) selected by lead researcher Joseph Salisbury at the University of New Hampshire, has made unique observations on ocean biology, chemistry and the environment in the Gulf of Mexico, as well as the coast of the United States and the Amazon River to the Atlantic Ocean.

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“This innovative instrument from the University of New Hampshire, chosen by the NASA agency, will provide a powerful new tool for studying important ecosystem,” said NASA Director Jim Bridenstine.

The tool was chosen from among eight proposals considered, with a prize value of $ 107.9 million, the largest award from NASA in the history of the University of New Hampshire.

The tool will be integrated GLIMR on a selected NASA platform and launched in a time frame 2026-2027 in a geostationary orbit, where it will be able to observe a large area, based on the Gulf of Mexico, for up to 15 hours a day.

The instrument GLIMR will be able to collect many observations for a specific area every day, a crucial ability to study phenomena such as the life cycle of coastal the phytoplankton and oil spills in a way that will not be possible from a low-Earth orbit satellite. Due to its unique spatial and temporal accuracy, the GLIMR complementing other Earth orbit satellites that observe the ocean.

Read also: NASA monitors new details of tropical storm Nari, warns of its consequences

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Izaan Zubair
Izaan's expertise in technology urged him to write on emerging inventions, Hardware, Cyber-Security, Mobiles and so on. He is currently studying Machine learning, and aims to master it. He can be reached at: [email protected]

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