Wednesday, April 8, 2020

WMO: Future generations will face severe climate change

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Robert Frank
Robert Frank
Robert started his career as a freelance content writer. Now, He is the founder of widely-recognized PR Agency. Robert still writes news pieces on various publications.

Future generations will face severe and growing impacts of climate change, including rising temperatures, sea levels and disruption of marine and terrestrial ecosystems, if the greenhouse gases continue to rise in the atmosphere, said the World Meteorological Organization.

These gases hit a new record in the atmosphere in 2018 and increased rapidly over the past decade, WMO Secretary-General Petteri Taalas said at a news conference on Monday, noting that the concentration of carbon dioxide produced by burning fossil fuels is the largest contributor to global warming.

Read also: Europe is warming faster than expected because of climate change

Global warming has increased from 405.5 million ppm in 2017 to 407.8 in 2018, exceeding the average increase between 2005 and 2015.

Taalas explained that the last time the earth saw similar concentrations of carbon dioxide was 3 to 5 million years ago, warning of the levels of methane and nitrous oxide, which also cause greenhouse gases, as they rose to record levels.

He pointed out that all countries should work together on climate change, especially European, North America, the United States and China to counter the rise in greenhouse gases, especially as these countries are the largest producer of them.

Read also: Paris Climate Agreement: America’s exit leaves everyone cold

Robert Frank
Robert Frank
Robert started his career as a freelance content writer. Now, He is the founder of widely-recognized PR Agency. Robert still writes news pieces on various publications.

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